Soaked Pancakes from Nourishing Traditions

Soaked Pancakes from Nourishing Traditions

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups freshly ground whole wheat pastry flour (or spelt, kamut flour)
  • 2 cups yogurt, buttermilk or kefir  (I used raw milk with 2 tsp of apple cider vinegar)
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 2 T melted butter

Preparation: Soak flour in yogurt (or buttermilk/kefir) in warm place for 12-24 hours.

After soaking time, add eggs, salt, baking soda, and melted butter.  Add water if necessary to obtain the desired thinness. Cook on a hot, oiled griddle or cast iron skillet.  Serve with melted butter, real grade B maple syrup, raw honey, berry syrup, or fruit butter.

NOTE:  When I first learned about soaking grains, I was nervous.  Leaving grains out with milk overnight?  It sounded like a quick invite for food poisoning.  After many hours of research and many more food experiments, I am a believer.  Soaking grains allows a natural fermentation to occur that increases the absorption of nutrients.  To learn more, check out Whats the Fuss About Soaking Grains by The Nourishing Gourmet.

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Weekly Recipe Roundup: Cinnamon Buns, Sweet Potatoes, Girl Scout Cookies, and Honey Lime Enchiladas

Once upon a time, I didn’t know how to cook.   As newly-weds, we ate stroganoff for dinner every week along with cheesy soup, enchiladas, and cereal.  The day quickly came when I thought one more bite of stroganoff would KILL me.

I hounded people for recipes like a moth begging for light.  My survival depended upon it.

Our stroganoff death-binge taught me one thing.

I like variety.

I rarely make the same thing twice, unless the dish is beyond incredible. When it comes to healthy eating, you have to be willing to “shake it up a bit.”  Living off of lettuce alone may increase your chances of looking awesome in that bikini, but after a while you are going to binge on something not-so-amazing.  Matt Stone in Diet Recovery teaches that dieting is like holding your breath.  You can only hold it for so long.  Eventually you are going to have to breathe again if you want to live.

Changing up my meals makes healthy food exciting.  Plain and simple. It helps me learn my boundaries and avoid the deprivation/binge cycle of dieting.

Here are some of our favorite recipe finds this week:

Now it’s your turn to share.  What amazing recipes did you concoct this week?

How To: Make Baby Formula with Goat’s Milk

Damaris at Kitchen Corners has an awesome recipe for homemade infant formula and so does Lindsay over at Passionate Homemaker with her Natural Goat’s Milk Formula.  To make my baby formula, I mixed the two of them together, tweaked things around, and created a formula that helps feed “little-miss-hungry” when breastfeeding was no longer an option.

Infant Formula

  • 2 cups goat milk
  • 2 cups water
  • 1 1/2 tsp blackstrap molasses
  • 1 tsp infant probiotics
  • 2 tsp organic maple syrup
  • 1 tsp sunflower oil
  • 1 tsp olive oil
  • 1 tsp coconut oil
  • 1 tsp nutritional yeast

Combine ingredients in a mason jar and stir with a wooden spoon.  Just FYI, the formula only last for 24 hours in the refrigerator.  I can now make this formula with a baby on the hip and a toddler hanging off my ankle.  Its pretty simple once you get the hang of it.

I also supplement with Dr. Christopher’s KID-eMins, Barlean’s O-mega Oil, and a DHA vitamin drop.  Because baby girl’s favorite food is packed with vitamin C, I didn’t worry so much about adding the acerola powder.

One thing is for certain: little girl loves this formula.

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As noted in our disclaimer below, take any and all health information and make your own informed decision.  We are not licensed pediatricians.  If you have any concerns about feeding your child this formula, please consult your doctor.

Almond Butter Chocolate Pie with Graham Cracker Crust

Almond Butter Chocolate Pie with Graham Cracker Crust Adapted from Double Delicious!: Good, Simple Food for Busy, Complicated Lives

1 1/2 cup graham crackers – whole wheat sugar free
3 tablespoons organic butter
2 cups soy or rice milk
1/4 cup arrow root powder
1/3 cup sucanat
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 organic eggs
1 tablespoon pure vanilla extract
1/2 cup creamy almond butter
1 tbsp unsweetened cocoa powder

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. In a medium sized bowl, combine graham cracker crumbs and butter. Pour into a 9-inch pie plate and press the crumb mixture into the bottom and sides of the plate to form and even crust. Bake for 5 minutes, or until golden brown. Set aside to cool.

In a large saucepan over medium heat, whisk together the milk, arrow root powder, 1/3 cup of sucanat, salt, and eggs. Stir occasionally. When the mixture begins to thicken, stir constantly to avoid lumps. Turn off the heat when the mixture comes to a boil and has reached a pudding consistency.

Add the vanilla extract. Pour half of the mixture into a medium bowl. Make the almond butter layer by adding almond butter and stirring to incorporate. Add the cocoa powder to the other half other milk mixture to make the chocolate layer.

Pour the chocolate mixture into the pie crust, then top with the almond butter layer. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate, at least 2 hours, until set.

How To: Make Vegetable Broth Powder

My kids and I have this little game we like to play. I say “guess what?” and they reply with “chicken butt.” It is the only time they are allowed to say the word “butt.” Needless to say, they love the game very much.

Now it is our turn.

Guess what?

No.

Not chicken butt.

Homemade vegetable broth powder is amazing and easy to make. One of the main ingredients in this vegetable broth powder is nutritional yeast. It looks something like this:

what nutritional yeast powder looks like.

Nutritional yeast can be found in the bulk aisle at most food stores in the form of flakes or powder.  A complete protein with high levels of B-complex vitamins, nutritional yeast is a friend to all.  Sprinkled on homemade popcorn, mixed in green smoothies, and/or  spread over a hot pan of roasted potatoes – nutritional yeast is simply amazing… but not on ice cream.  Trust me on that one.

I use this broth in soups and in place of salt on many of our favorite dishes.  The beginning price may be daunting, but the dried herbs will store and result in multiple batches of powdery goodness.  Make it by the bulk and enjoy it for a very long time.

Vegetable Broth Powder

2 cups Nutritional Yeast
1/2 cup sea salt
2 Tablespoons onion powder
1 Tablespoon turmeric
2 teaspoons dried dill weed
2 teaspoons marjoram (optional)
2 teaspoons dried powdered lemon peel (optional)
1 teaspoon celery seed
1 teaspoon basil
1 teaspoon powdered thyme
1 Tablespoon dried parsley

Incorporate everything from nutritional yeast to parsley in a dry blender.  With the lid firmly attached, blend spices until a smooth powder forms. This broth powder loves to be stored in an air tight container inside of a kitchen cupboard.  To make veggie broth, add 1 tbsp of powder to every quart of water.

With an insanely long shelf life, it will (most likely) outlive the life of my son’s eternal goldfish swimming around next to my kitchen sink lovingly named KaKaPooPoo, Hand, and Small.

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The majority of my spices were purchased online through Mountain Rose Herbs and nutritional yeast can be purchased on Amazon.  Simple.  In the end, I didn’t have to leave the house at all to purchase a two-year-supply of vegetable broth powder.  Love it!